Anthropology BA Archaeology

Program Purpose


Students in archaeology at BYU learn to view the world with an 'anthropological perspective,' seeing the varieties of humanity throughout history in holistic, worldwide terms. Students also gain an appreciation for the creativity and diversity of humankind over time through the study, excavation, and analysis of archaeological remains. Toward that end, the curriculum in Archaeology offers a diversity of classes on the peoples and cultures of the world, past and present. Students taking the Archaeology Emphasis learn the most critical theories and methodologies of archaeology, in addition to how to apply these paradigms to archaeological research, site excavation, and the interpretation of archaeological materials. Students are thus prepared with the tools necessary to practice archaeology in today's complex world through mastering both class assignments and mentored instruction in on-site excavation practices, laboratory analysis, and writing in the discipline. The program also seeks to instill in students the fundamental tenets and ethics of the Archaeology as they are governed by both national and international professional and legal standards.  BYU Archaeology Field Schools are held alternately between sites in the American Southwest or at Petra, Jordan.

Curricular Structure

Catalog Information
Major Academic Plan

 

Learning Outcomes


Effective and Professional Communication

Graduates will be able to write clearly & precisely in all types of communication demanded by the discipline. 

Courses that Contribute: ANTHR 110 ANTHR 150 ANTHR 215 ANTHR 314 ANTHR 340 ANTHR 343 ANTHR 350 ANTHR 351 ANTHR 355 ANTHR 377 ANTHR 378 ANTHR 385 ANTHR 390R ANTHR 412 ANTHR 414 ANTHR 455 ANTHR 460 ANTHR 511 ANTHR 530
Linked to BYU Aims: Competence, Lifelong learning
Human Cultural History and Diversity

Graduates will possess a solid knowledge of the diversity of past human cultures both in the New World and the Old World including World Prehistory, as well as how the theories and methodologies of Archaeology have contributed to that knowledge.

 

Courses that Contribute: ANTHR 103 ANTHR 110 ANTHR 150 ANTHR 201 ANTHR 202 ANTHR 203 ANTHR 215 ANTHR 300 ANTHR 311 ANTHR 330 ANTHR 340 ANTHR 343 ANTHR 350 ANTHR 351 ANTHR 355 ANTHR 375 ANTHR 376 ANTHR 377 ANTHR 378 ANTHR 385 ANTHR 390R ANTHR 455 ANTHR 511 ANTHR 530
Linked to BYU Aims: Communicate effectively, Lifelong service
Research Skills and Methods

Graduates will gain experience with qualitative and quantitative methods used to gather, process, and interpret archaeological data.

 

Courses that Contribute: ANTHR 110 ANTHR 150 ANTHR 201 ANTHR 202 ANTHR 203 ANTHR 215 ANTHR 340 ANTHR 343 ANTHR 350 ANTHR 351 ANTHR 355 ANTHR 377 ANTHR 378 ANTHR 385 ANTHR 390R ANTHR 412 ANTHR 414 ANTHR 454 ANTHR 455 ANTHR 460 ANTHR 511 ANTHR 530
Linked to BYU Aims: Quantitative reasoning, Competence
Social Theory

Program graduates will understand and be able apply contemporary social theory in the analysis of archaeological sites and artifacts.

Courses that Contribute: ANTHR 110 ANTHR 150 ANTHR 215 ANTHR 311 ANTHR 343 ANTHR 350 ANTHR 355 ANTHR 375 ANTHR 376 ANTHR 377 ANTHR 378 ANTHR 385 ANTHR 390R ANTHR 455 ANTHR 511
Linked to BYU Aims: Human knowledge, Lifelong service
Archaeological Field Methods

Students will be competent in basic archaeological field methods.

Courses that Contribute: None
Linked to BYU Aims: Competence, Character

Evidence of Learning


Assessment tools including faculty evaluations of individual student portfolios at the completion of the capstone sequence.

Student advisement during program.

Four capstone courses that include student performance in an on-site archaeological field school, a follow-up artifact analysis laboratory, and a senior thesis course that requires both an oral presentation and written thesis demonstrating the student's application of learned and applied knowledge. 

Exit surveys of graduating seniors.

Alumni surveys of previous graduates.

Direct Measures

1. Graded course work such as exams, written assignments, projects, and field work (Examples of graded student products representative of the range of grades are kept on file.)

2. Semi-annual reports on student progress by the faculty advisor.

3. Student accomplishments in obtaining ORCA grants, publications, awards, etc.

4. Graduates' success in obtaining employment or admission to graduate programs.

Indirect Measures

1. Senior exit surveys

2. BYU alumni surveys

Learning and Teaching Assessment and Improvement


Data documenting the assessment measures are filed in the main office. This data is analyzed and summarized by the undergraduate coordinator and presented to the faculty each year. From ensuing discussions, decisions are made by the faculty for revising the curriculum and improving student learning.

Analysis, evaluation, and improvements necessary for the archaeology program are gleaned by the archaeology faculty (or their designates) through the following precesses:  1) reading the required individual student portfolios created at the end of the capstone sequence of courses each semester.  This portfolio includes the final senior thesis, three research papers or written projects selected by the student from any of their previous courses in the department, and a one-day selection from the pages of their Site Field Notebook from the student's Archaeological Field School experience that demonstrates the student's ability to accurately record excavation data;  2)  analyzing deficiencies and proposing changes to the archaeology program to address these deficiencies. 

Outstanding Capstone senior thesis papers are selected by the archaeology faculty for awards at a yearly honors banquet.

The above process allows extensive review of the program on a semester-by-semester basis.  Curriculum improvement decisions are made by the entire faculty and changes are submitted to the College and University Curriculum Committees via the standard forms and processes. 

Exit surveys of all graduating seniors are also utilized to discuss suggested improvements to the program.

We attempt to track all graduating students to monitor their acceptance into graduate programs, employment venues, as well as their program satisfaction after a lead time out of our department, given their experiences post the BYU undergraduate archaeology program.