Nursing MS Family Nurse Practitioner

Program Purpose


The purpose of Brigham Young University College of Nursing is to develop professional nurses who promote health, care for the suffering, engage in the scholarship of the discipline, invite the Spirit into health and healing, and lead with faith and integrity. Students learn the science and advanced practice of nursing within the context of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The College seeks to meet the aims of a BYU Education "to be (1) spiritually strengthening, (2) intellectually enlarging, (3) character building leading to (4) life-long learning and service". Graduates of the program are expected to achieve stated learning outcomes.

Curricular Structure

The College of Nursing offers a generic Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) Program leading to a Master of Science degree. Graduates are prepared to provide evidence-based nursing care to diverse individuals, families, and groups in managing health and illness across the continuum of care and across the lifespan.

The graduate program builds on the cognates of the baccalaureate degree and assumes that students bring from their undergraduate programs the appropriate skills in written and verbal communication, mathematics, critical thinking, basic patient assessment, and problem solving. Entrance into the graduate program also assumes that students, having graduated from baccalaureate nursing programs, have had exposure to a basic level of nursing practice, understand the health care system, cultural, social, and political perspectives that impact health beliefs and health care and an awareness of legal and ethical concerns in nursing practice. In order for students to be prepared to address complex statistical issues in evidence-based practice and to understand complex pathophysiological conditions, students must also have passed courses in fundamental statistics and pathophysiology.

The graduate curriculum is divided into four sections: the Graduate Nursing Core, the Advanced Practice Core, the Poulation Focus of Family Across the Life Span, and Capstone Experiences.

The Graduate Nursing Core courses are designed to equip students with the skills and roles necessary to function as advanced practice nurses who understand how to translate the best evidence into clinical decision making and clinical practice. They learn about advanced practice theories, roles, issues, finance, and ethics. These core courses also provide students with the background necessary to influence health care planning and health care policy. In addition the courses prepare them in the use organizational and systems leadership, informatics and health care technologices, and quality improvement and safety strategies. Also the core courses prepares them to work interprofessionally to plan care. The graduate core courses includes 15 credit hours and includes the following courses:

Nurs 600: Nursing Science I: Evidence Based Research

Nurs 601:     Nursing Science II: Translating and Integrating Scholarship and Evidence into Practice

Nurs 605:     Organizational and Systems Leadership

Nurs  606:     Advanced Practice Nursing Theories, Roles, Issues, and Ethics and Interprofessional Collaboration

Nurs  608:     Health Care Policy, Advocacy, and Finance

The Advanced Practice Core courses help students to gain knowledge and skills that undergird advanced practice nursing, including pharmacology, advanced pathophysiology/genetics/genomics, and advanced health assessment across the life span. The advanced practice core courses includes 9 credit hours and  the following courses:

Nurs    555      Pharmacology in Advanced Practice

Nurs    603     Applied Pharmacology in Advanced Practice

Nurs    619     Advanced Pathophysiology and Genetics/Genomics

Nurs    621      Advanced Health Assessment Across the Life Span

Population Focus (Family/Across the Life Span)  courses provide students with the knowledge and specific skills necessary to pratice as a Family Nurse Practitioner. The Family Nurse Practitioner population focus includes 24 credit hours and the following courses:

Nurs     622       Diagnosis and Management of Adult Common Disorders

Nurs     624       Clinical Practicum 1

Nurs     625       Diagnosis and Management of Pediatric and Adolescent Disorders and Family Health

Nurs     626       Clinical Practicum 2

Nurs     627        Procedures and Diagnostics for Advanced-Practice Nurses

Nurs     628       Clinical Practicum 3

Nurs     630       Diagnosis and Management of Chronic Adult and Geriatric Disorders

Nurs     632       Diagnosis and Management of Acute Disorders Across the Life Span

Capstone Experiences include the course(s) related to the culminating writing experience and the family nurse practitioner internship and total 11-14 credit hours depending on the culminating writing experience option selected.  The culminating writing experience  allows students to prepare a manuscript for publication by completing  a thesis, project, or evidence-based scholarly paper that addresses a clinical topic of real consequence. The capstone experiences include the following courses:

Nurs      698R     Project

Nurs      699R     Thesis

Nurs      623      Scholarly Writing 1: Introduction and Methods

Nurs      631       Scholarly Writing 2: Results and Discussion                              

Nurs      635R    Family Nurse Practitioner Internship

The FNP program is sequenced so that students are grounded in fundamental knowledge and skills  necessary for a family nurse practitioner which include the graduate core and advanced practice core. The population-focused core of family across the life span progresses from simple to  complex patient conditions and from common to chronic to acute disorders. There is a separate course that includes content specifically related to pediatric and adolescent populations and includes common, chronic, and acute disorders. A final clinical internship provides a focused and in-depth experience in settings approximating actual FNP practice. The culminating writing experience provides for an experience in preparing a manuscript on a clinical topic that is submitted for publication.

During the clinical courses, students and faculty are able to track conditions of patients followed by students in clinical settings to have a clear understanding of changes needed in clinical assignments in order to maximize the breadth of learning necessary to practice as a FNP. As students move through the curriculum, they are better prepared to assume interprofessional collaborative and independent roles in health care to influence health care planning and to act as advocates for appropriate change in health care.

The MAP, Graduate Program Overview, Graduate Handbook, and Graduate Program Guide are all available by accessing the CON website and entering the student information through "Academics."

Co-curricular activities that support program goals and provide opportunities for graduate student engagement are appointments as members of College Councils, membership in professional organizations, scholarly activity, and presentations at the annual College Scholarly Works Conference and professional conferences such as Western Institute of Nursing

Specific information regarding the graduate curriculum is available at the College of Nursing website (http://nursing.byu.edu) under "academics."

Program Information

Graduate Catalog

Learning Outcomes


The purpose of Brigham Young University College of Nursing is to develop professional nurses who promote health, care for the suffering, engage in the scholarship of the discipline, invite the Spirit into health and healing, and lead with faith and integrity. Students learn the science and advanced practice of nursing within the context of the teachings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The College seeks to meet the aims of a BYU Education "to be (1) spiritually strengthening, (2) intellectually enlarging, (3) character building leading to (4) life-long learning and service". Graduates of the program are expected to achieve stated learning outcomes.

Curricular Structure

The College of Nursing offers a generic Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) Program leading to a Master of Science degree. Graduates are prepared to provide evidence-based nursing care to diverse individuals, families, and groups in managing health and illness across the continuum of care and across the lifespan.

The graduate program builds on the cognates of the baccalaureate degree and assumes that students bring from their undergraduate programs the appropriate skills in written and verbal communication, mathematics, critical thinking, basic patient assessment, and problem solving. Entrance into the graduate program also assumes that students, having graduated from baccalaureate nursing programs, have had exposure to a basic level of nursing practice, understand the health care system, cultural, social, and political perspectives that impact health beliefs and health care and an awareness of legal and ethical concerns in nursing practice. In order for students to be prepared to address complex statistical issues in evidence-based practice and to understand complex pathophysiological conditions, students must also have passed courses in fundamental statistics and pathophysiology.

The graduate curriculum is divided into four sections: the Graduate Nursing Core, the Advanced Practice Core, the Poulation Focus of Family Across the Life Span, and Capstone Experiences.

The Graduate Nursing Core courses are designed to equip students with the skills and roles necessary to function as advanced practice nurses who understand how to translate the best evidence into clinical decision making and clinical practice. They learn about advanced practice theories, roles, issues, finance, and ethics. These core courses also provide students with the background necessary to influence health care planning and health care policy. In addition the courses prepare them in the use organizational and systems leadership, informatics and health care technologices, and quality improvement and safety strategies. Also the core courses prepares them to work interprofessionally to plan care. The graduate core courses includes 15 credit hours and includes the following courses:

Nurs 600: Nursing Science I: Evidence Based Research

Nurs 601:  Nursing Science II: Translating and Integrating Scholarship and Evidence into Practice

Nurs 605:  Organizational and Systems Leadership

Nurs 606:  Advanced Practice Nursing Theories, Roles, Issues, and Ethics and Interprofessional Collaboration

Nurs 608:   Health Care Policy, Advocacy, and Finance

The Advanced Practice Core courses help students to gain knowledge and skills that undergird advanced practice nursing, including pharmacology, advanced pathophysiology/genetics/genomics, and advanced health assessment across the life span. The advanced practice core courses includes 9 credit hours and  the following courses:

Nurs    555    Pharmacology in Advanced Practice

Nurs    603    Applied Pharmacology in Advanced Practice

Nurs    619     Advanced Pathophysiology and Genetics/Genomics

Nurs    621   Advanced Health Assessment Across the Life Span

Population Focus (Family/Across the Life Span)  courses provide students with the knowledge and specific skills necessary to pratice as a Family Nurse Practitioner. The Family Nurse Practitioner population focus includes 24 credit hours and the following courses:

Nurs     622       Diagnosis and Management of Adult Common Disorders

Nurs     624       Clinical Practicum 1

Nurs     625       Diagnosis and Management of Pediatric and Adolescent Disorders and Family Health

Nurs     626       Clinical Practicum 2

Nurs     627       Procedures and Diagnostics for Advanced-Practice Nurses

Nurs     628       Clinical Practicum 3

Nurs     630       Diagnosis and Management of Chronic Adult and Geriatric Disorders

Nurs     632       Diagnosis and Management of Acute Disorders Across the Life Span

Capstone Experiences include the course(s) related to the culminating writing experience and the family nurse practitioner internship and total 11-14 credit hours depending on the culminating writing experience option selected.  The culminating writing experience  allows students to prepare a manuscript for publication by completing  a thesis, project, or evidence-based scholarly paper that addresses a clinical topic of real consequence. The capstone experiences include the following courses:

Nurs      698R     Project

Nurs      699R     Thesis

Nurs      623      Scholarly Writing 1: Introduction and Methods

Nurs      631       Scholarly Writing 2: Results and Discussion                              

Nurs      635R    Family Nurse Practitioner Internship

The FNP program is sequenced so that students are grounded in fundamental knowledge and skills  necessary for a family nurse practitioner which include the graduate core and advanced practice core. The population-focused core of family across the life span progresses from simple to  complex patient conditions and from common to chronic to acute disorders. There is a separate course that includes content specifically related to pediatric and adolescent populations and includes common, chronic, and acute disorders. A final clinical internship provides a focused and in-depth experience in settings approximating actual FNP practice. The culminating writing experience provides for an experience in preparing a manuscript on a clinical topic that is submitted for publication.

During the clinical courses, students and faculty are able to track conditions of patients followed by students in clinical settings to have a clear understanding of changes needed in clinical assignments in order to maximize the breadth of learning necessary to practice as a FNP. As students move through the curriculum, they are better prepared to assume interprofessional collaborative and independent roles in health care to influence health care planning and to act as advocates for appropriate change in health care.

The MAP, Graduate Program Overview, Graduate Handbook, and Graduate Program Guide are all available by accessing the CON website and entering the student information through "Academics."

Co-curricular activities that support program goals and provide opportunities for graduate student engagement are appointments as members of College Councils, membership in professional organizations, scholarly activity, and presentations at the annual College Scholarly Works Conference and professional conferences such as Western Institute of Nursing

Specific information regarding the graduate curriculum is available at the College of Nursing website (http://nursing.byu.edu) under "academics."

Program Information

Graduate Catalog

Background for Practice from Sciences and Humanities

1) Integrates scientific findings from nursing, biopsychosocial fields, genetics, public health, quality improvement, and organizational sciences for continual improvement of patient care across diverse settings.

 

Courses that Contribute: NURS 555 NURS 600 NURS 601 NURS 603 NURS 605 NURS 606 NURS 608 NURS 619 NURS 622 NURS 624 NURS 626 NURS 628 NURS 632 NURS 635R
Linked to BYU Aims: Quantitative reasoning, Human knowledge, Competence
Organizational and Systems Leadership

2) Utlizes organizational and systems leadership to promote high quality and safe patient care.

Courses that Contribute: NURS 601 NURS 605 NURS 606 NURS 608 NURS 621 NURS 624 NURS 626 NURS 628 NURS 632 NURS 635R
Linked to BYU Aims: Think soundly, Communicate effectively, Human knowledge, Competence
Quality Improvement and Safety

3) Applies methods, tools, performance measures and standards related to quality improvement and safety within organizations.

Courses that Contribute: NURS 600 NURS 605 NURS 606 NURS 607 NURS 608 NURS 624 NURS 626 NURS 628 NURS 632 NURS 635R
Linked to BYU Aims: Think soundly, Communicate effectively, Competence, Character
Translating and Integrating Scholarship and Practice

4) Participates as a change agent in translating and integrating scholarship and evidence into practice settings to optimize quality patient outcomes.

Courses that Contribute: NURS 555 NURS 600 NURS 601 NURS 603 NURS 606 NURS 619 NURS 622 NURS 623 NURS 626 NURS 628 NURS 630 NURS 631 NURS 632 NURS 635R
Linked to BYU Aims: Think soundly, Communicate effectively, Quantitative reasoning, Competence
Informatics and Healthcare Technologies

5) Utilizes patient-centered and communication technologies to integrate, coordinate, deliver, and enhance health care.

Courses that Contribute: NURS 606 NURS 607 NURS 626 NURS 628 NURS 632 NURS 635R
Linked to BYU Aims: Think soundly, Communicate effectively, Quantitative reasoning, Competence
Health Policy and Advocacy

6) Intervene at the system level through the policy development process and employing advocacy strategies to influence health and health care.

Courses that Contribute: NURS 606 NURS 607 NURS 608 NURS 635R
Linked to BYU Aims: Think soundly, Communicate effectively, Human knowledge, Competence
Interprofessional Collaboration for Improving Patient Care

7) Participates, consults, communicates and collaborates as a member and leader of interprofessional teams to manage and coordinate care.

Courses that Contribute: NURS 601 NURS 605 NURS 606 NURS 608 NURS 621 NURS 626 NURS 628 NURS 632 NURS 635R
Linked to BYU Aims: Think soundly, Communicate effectively, Human knowledge, Competence
Clinical Prevention and Population Health

8) Applies and integrates broad organizational, client-centered, culturally appropriate concepts in planning, delivery, managing, and evaluating evidence-based clinical prevention and population care and services to individuals, families and aggregates/identified populations.

Courses that Contribute: NURS 555 NURS 600 NURS 601 NURS 606 NURS 607 NURS 608 NURS 619 NURS 621 NURS 622 NURS 626 NURS 628 NURS 630 NURS 632 NURS 635R
Linked to BYU Aims: Think soundly, Human knowledge, Lifelong learning, Lifelong service
Master's Level Nursing Practice

9) Provides competent evidence based advance-practice nursing care as a family nurse practitioner to diverse individuals, families, and groups and manages health and illness across the continuum of care and across the lifespan.

Courses that Contribute: NURS 555 NURS 600 NURS 601 NURS 603 NURS 605 NURS 606 NURS 607 NURS 619 NURS 621 NURS 622 NURS 626 NURS 628 NURS 630 NURS 632 NURS 635R
Linked to BYU Aims: Think soundly, Competence, Character, Lifelong learning
Practices According to the Healer's Art

10) Provides care in a compassionae manner that respects, protects, and enhances spiritual integrity, human dignity, cultural diversity, and demonstrates the Healer's art.

Courses that Contribute: NURS 601 NURS 606 NURS 607 NURS 608 NURS 621 NURS 622 NURS 626 NURS 628 NURS 630 NURS 632 NURS 635R
Linked to BYU Aims: Faith and testimony, Gospel knowledge, Lifelong service

Evidence of Learning


Assessment Tools

Assessment tools of the graduate program are part of the formal evaluation plan of the entire College of Nursing. Program related assessment information is collected, evaluated, and kept by the College Evalution Committee, the Graduate Academic Council, the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Scholarly Works and Contribution to the Discipline. Following is an outline of assessment tools used in the graduate nursing program:

1. Graduate Course Tools - written and oral examinations, clinical evaluations, classroom projects, written papers, case studies etc.

2. Student Ratings of Course/Instructor Tool - required by every teacher each time the course is taught

3. Employment Rates - these are tabulated 10 months after graduation

4. Overall Presentation and Publication Rates of Student Thesis, Evidence Based Scholarly Papers, and Projects

5. Graduate Assistantships and Graduate Mentoring Awards - these are applied for each year

6. Overall Performance Tool of Each Graduate Student - done biannually

7. Clinical Evaluation Tool of Graduate Student by Faculty Member - done at the end of each clinical rotation for each student

8. Clinical Evaluation Tool of Graduate Student by Clinical Preceptor - done at the end of  each clinical rotation for each student

9. Clinical Evaluation Tool  of Preceptor by Student - done at the end of each clinical rotation of each preceptor by each student

10. Clinical Site Evaluation Tool by  Student- done at the end of each semester for every clinical site.

11. Pass Rate on Family Nurse Practitioner Certification Examination (American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) or American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP)) reviewed annually

12. End of Program Evaluation Tool by Students - done at the time of graduation.

13. Typhoon Tracking Tool which allows evaluation of student from dependent practice to independent practice

14. College Alumni Survey Tool - done annually of Alumni one and five years after graduation.

15. University Alumni Survey Tool - done annually three years after graduation.

16. Graduate Forum - done annually for student feedback about the program.

17. Course Report Tool - done annually at the end of each academic year for each course

18. Faculty Stewardship Interview & Reports - done annually, faculty self-evaluation by with Dean/Associate Deans with input from Course Coordinators and Council Chairs.

19. Rank & Status Process - done according to the University and College Policies, includes faculty self evaluation, peer evaluation, and teaching portfolio.

20. College Self-Study for University Regional Accreditation Northwest - every 10 years

21. College Self-Study for Professional Accreditation (CCNE) every 10 years

22. Unit University Review and Graduate Program Review - done every 5-7 years

23. College/University Resource Planning - done annually

Direct Measures

1. Graduate Course Tools - written and oral examinations, clinical evaluations, classroom projects

2. Publications and Presentations related to Theses, Evidence Based Scholarly Papers, and Projects

3. Pass Rates on Certification Exams

4. Employment Rates

5. Faculty Evaluation of Overall Student Performance

6. Faculty Evaluation of Clinical Performance

7. Preceptor Evaluation of Clinical Performance of Students

8. Graduate Fellowships and Graduate Mentoring Awards

9. Typhoon Tracking - Evaluating Student Moving from Dependence to Independence in the Management of Patients 

Indirect Measures

1. Graduate Student Forum

2. Course Reports

3. College Self Study for Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE)

4. College Self Study for University Regional Accreditation (Northwest Commission On Collegiate and Universities)

5. University Unit Review and Graduate Program Review

6. Student Ratings of Course/Instructor

7. University Alumni Survey

8. College Alumni Survey

9. End of Program Evaluation by Students

10. Faculty Stewardship Interviews

11. Clinical Evaluation of Preceptors by Students

12. Clinical Site Evaluation by Students

13. Rank & Status Process

14. College Resource Planning

 

 

Learning and Teaching Assessment and Improvement