Arabic Language BA

Program Purpose


The Arabic Language major is designed to assist students in acquiring the linguistic and cultural fluency necessary to function effectively in the modern Arab world. This secondary major serves students simultaneously pursuing a wide variety of majors (political science, international relations, linguistics, engineering, etc.). Most of these students are focused on the modern Middle East, but the major also provides valuable experience and skills for others, such as those who are primarily interested in the Medieval period or in linguistics. Primary emphasis is on acquiring and using Arabic as it is used today at an Advanced to Superior level (as measured on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages scale). A holistic approach to Arabic helps students learn how to deal with the realities of Arab speech communities. 

Learning Outcomes


Advanced High Level Fluency

Speak, read, and write Arabic at the Advanced High Level (demonstrating an ability to support opinions, hypothesize, and deal with abstract topics in depth).

Courses that Contribute: ARAB 411R ARAB 424R ARAB 495R
Linked to BYU Aims: Communicate effectively, Competence
Integration

Students will develop expertise in an area of specialization and deliver a major oral presentation and a written paper (both in Arabic) on a topic in that area of specialization. 

Courses that Contribute: ARAB 411R ARAB 495R
Linked to BYU Aims: Competence, Lifelong service

Evidence of Learning


Rubric for Assessing Program Learning Outcomes (Direct Measures)

1. Oral Proficiency Interview. (Outcome 1)

2. Writing Proficiency Test. (Outcome 1)

3. Reading Proficiency Test. (Outcome 1)

4. Copies of final paper and videos of final oral presentation. (Outcomes 1 and 2)

Indirect Measures

We regularly video tape classes and presentations and ask students about their experiences. Interns are required to report weekly on their experience.

One indicator of the strength of our program is the fact that the Center for the Advanced Study of Arabic, the nation's premiere advanced-level Arabic program, has mimiced what we are doing and places some of their fellows in the same ministry in Amman doing the same work that our interns do.

Learning and Teaching Assessment and Improvement


The Arabic faculty review the results of the assesments every October and discuss ways of improving the students' learning experience so that they are more likely to benefit in a significant manner. These adjustments are then implemented when the new cohort begins in January.