Manufacturing Engineering Technology BS

Program Purpose


MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

Manufacturing is a multidisciplinary profession that draws on engineering and technology, business and the social sciences.

 

Program Mission, Vision and Program Objectives/Goals

 

Mission

The mission of the manufacturing engineering technology program is to prepare students to be leaders in the world of manufacturing and to be contributors to their profession and to society.

 

Values

The values that guide our goals and strategic planning can be summarized as follows:

  1. The education and professional preparation of our students is our top priority.
  2. MET faculty will be excellent in their chosen areas of focus by active participation in industry projects and industrially relevant research.
  3. The educational aims of BYU guide our direction.
Program Educational Objectives

The MET Program Education Objectives are aligned with its Vision/Mission and the Four Pillars of Manufacturing Knowledge. The MET graduates shall:

  1. Be leaders in the world of Manufacturing,
  2. Be life-long learners and contributors to the field of Manufacturing,
  3. Be positive contributors to society their communities, and their church; and
  4. Understand the ethical, economic, social and environmental impact Manufacturing has on society.

 

Vision/Philosophy

Manufacturing in today's complex world is an interdisciplinary endeavor, integrating technical knowledge with business, social (employment, safety, labor costs, culture, etc.) and environmental factors. In order to prepare our students for successful and fulfilling careers, we combine scientific principles and manufacturing theory with lab-based exercises and projects. This approach gives our students an opportunity to gain the practical knowledge and technical competency that is sought after by the manufacturing community. We value industrially relevant research where we actively involve both graduate and undergraduate students in our work, even as we look for ways to incorporate our findings into our coursework. As our students emerge from the MET program, they will be prepared to make an immediate and impactful contribution to the organizations they serve, and will be recognized for their competence and character.

 

We believe this vision can best be achieved by integrating the four pillars of manufacturing (proposed by the Society of Manufacturing Engineers) with our mission and values around a manufacturing technical core. This is illustrated in the diagram below, where our values form the foundation of our program, and where the four pillars of manufacturing support our mission.

Curricular Structure

Catalog Information

Major Academic Plan

Learning Outcomes


Competencies of Manufacturing Engineering Technology (MET) Graduates

The Four Pillars of Manufacturing Knowledge - Pillar I. Materials and Manufacturing Processes

Materials

Program graduates will understand the behavior and properties of materials as they are affected by manufacturing processes.

Courses that Contribute: MFG 331 MFG 355 MFG 434
Linked to BYU Aims: Quantitative reasoning, Competence
Science

Program graduates will be able to apply knowledge of mathematics, statistics, science, and engineering in manufacturing

Courses that Contribute: MFG 355 MFG 434
Linked to BYU Aims: Quantitative reasoning, Competence
Manufacturing Processes

Program graduates will be able to verify thier knowledge of manufacturing processes and the skills to develop and manipulate the operating parameters for a given process.

Courses that Contribute: MFG 355 MFG 220 MFG 230 MFG 331 MFG 434 MFG 575
Linked to BYU Aims: Think soundly, Competence

The Four Pillars of Manufacturing Knowledge - Pillar IV. Manufacturing Competitiveness

Communication

Program graduates will be able to communicate effectively through speaking, writing, and listening.

Courses that Contribute: MFG 130 MFG 220 MFG 340 MFG 399R MFG 434
Linked to BYU Aims: Communicate effectively
Global Environment

Program graduates will be able to explain the impact of manufacturing engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.

Courses that Contribute: MFG 291 MFG 340 MFG 399R MFG 479
Linked to BYU Aims: Think soundly, Human knowledge
Competitiveness

Graduates will relate the creation of competitive advantage through manufacturing planning, strategy, and control.

Courses that Contribute: MFG 340 MFG 431 MFG 434 MFG 480
Linked to BYU Aims: Quantitative reasoning
Life-Long Learning

Program graduates will be able to recognize the need for and will prepare to be engaged in lifelong learning.

Courses that Contribute: MFG 491A MFG 491B MFG 291 MFG 399R
Linked to BYU Aims: Lifelong learning
Experimental Analysis

Program graduates will be able to design and conduct experiments and to analyze and interpret experimental data.

Courses that Contribute: MFG 340 MFG 434
Linked to BYU Aims: Quantitative reasoning
Contemporary

Program graduates will be able to explain contemporary issues in manufacturing.

Courses that Contribute: MFG 220 MFG 230 MFG 291 MFG 340 MFG 399R MFG 431
Linked to BYU Aims: Human knowledge
Leadership

Program graduates will be able to function effectively on teams and to demonstrate leadership characteristics.

Courses that Contribute: MFG 220 MFG 291
Linked to BYU Aims: Communicate effectively, Competence

The Four Pillars of Manufacturing Knowledge - Pillar II. Product, Tooling and Assembly Engineering

Design

Graduates will be able to explain the design of products and the equipment, tooling, and environment necessary for their manufacture.

Courses that Contribute: MFG 331 MFG 355 MFG 431 MFG 434
Linked to BYU Aims: Quantitative reasoning, Competence
Creativity and Problem Solving

Program graduates will be able to identify, formulate and solve manufacturing engineering problems.

Courses that Contribute: MFG 230 MFG 355 MFG 431 MFG 575
Linked to BYU Aims: Communicate effectively, Competence

The Four Pillars of Manufacturing Knowledge - Pillar III. Manufacturing Systems and Operations

System Design

Program graduates will be able to design a system, component or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability and sustainability.

Courses that Contribute: MFG 480
Linked to BYU Aims: Quantitative reasoning, Competence
Systems

Graduates will be able to demonstrate the analysis, synthesis, and control of manufacturing operations using statistical and calculus-based methods, simulation, and information technology.

Courses that Contribute: MFG 480
Linked to BYU Aims: Quantitative reasoning, Competence

Evidence of Learning


To assess the effectiveness in achieving these learning outcomes we have set up the following feedback mechanisms:

Direct Measures

  1. Regular exams and assignments testing student's abilities in the areas identified.
  2. Semi-annual meeting between students and the MET industrial advisory board where students are quizzed as to their abilities in each area.

Indirect Measures

  1. Semi-annual meeting between faculty and the MET industrial advisory board to review curriculum.
  2. An exit interview and questionnaire asking students to assess their own proficiency in each area upon graduation.
  3. Alumni surveys seeking feedback on adequacy of curriculum for their professions.
  4. Employer surveys where employers evaluate the competencies of our graduates.

Learning and Teaching Assessment and Improvement


Each year when data is collected through the methods described above, faculty meet to review the curriculum to make adjustments as necessary. Proposed curriculum changes are reviewed with our industrial advisory board before being submitted to the university.