Counseling Psychology PHD

Program Purpose


Educational Philosophy and Training Model

The CP program emphasizes the educational, developmental, preventative, and remedial functions of counseling psychologists. Students are primarily prepared to work as counseling psychologists in academic departments and counseling centers in university and college settings, although they are also qualified to seek clerkship, internship, and post-doctoral employment in other mental health settings.

The CP program is primarily psychological in nature and is based upon the scientist-practitioner model of training. The scientist-practitioner model is an integrated approach to training that acknowledges the interdependence of theory, research, and practice. Counseling psychologists engage in the pursuit and application of psychological and educational knowledge to promote optimal development for individuals, groups, and systems and to provide remedies for the psychological and educational difficulties that encumber them.

Faculty members in the CP program fully support both the academic and spiritual mission and aims of BYU. In the CP program, we seek to integrate, where appropriate, spiritual with psychological perspectives in our classes. Currently, efforts to integrate spirituality and psychology occur in a number of ways:

By providing training in religious and spiritual aspects of diversity and treatment, we produce graduates who are able to sensitively work with the large client population in the U.S. who come from various religiously committed backgrounds. In this regard, we help fill a void left by secular training programs that typically provide little or no training in this domain (Richards & Bergin, 2000; Shafranske, 2000).

Program Education and Training Objectives

The overall goal of the counseling psychology program at BYU is to prepare students to work as competent counseling psychologists in university counseling centers or other educational and mental health settings where the developmental and preventative functions of counseling psychologists are valued. Faculty seek to increase students' knowledge of psychological theory, research and practice, enhance students performance of psychological practice, and help students acquire and develop ethical and professional dispositions and attitudes. In an evaluation meeting conducted at the conclusion of fall and winter semesters, faculty members collectively rate each student on their knowledge, performance, and disposition and attitudes. Students who are judged as deficient in any of these competency areas are given opportunities to remediate their deficiencies. If deficiencies are severe and persistent, students are counseled out of the program or dropped if they fail to remediate the deficiencies over time.

Within each of these three competency areas, there are five domains that we seek to promote professional development in: (1) scientific foundations, (2) theory and practice of counseling psychology, (3) psychological assessment and diagnosis, (4) cultural and individual diversity, and (5) life-long scholarly inquiry. In an effort to more clearly communicate how our programs goals/objectives, assessment methods, and outcomes are linked, we have created a table which is presented in Appendix A. This table is organized according to the conceptual framework described above and summarizes material described in sections B1 - B4 in this self-study. This table is used to guide faculty curriculum development and evaluation efforts.


Handbook for PhD Counseling Psychology

Program Information

Curricular Structure

Graduate Catalog

Learning Outcomes


 

Scholarship

Students are able to plan, develop, and disseminate scholarly works.

Courses that Contribute: CPSE 606 CPSE 644 CPSE 646 CPSE 647 CPSE 649 CPSE 656 CPSE 679R CPSE 702 CPSE 710 CPSE 715 CPSE 744 CPSE 746 CPSE 748 CPSE 776R CPSE 778R CPSE 779R CPSE 790R
Linked to BYU Aims: Quantitative reasoning, Human knowledge
Counseling Practice

Students demonstrate competence in assessment and interventions consistent with their future role as health service psychologists. 

 

 

Courses that Contribute: CPSE 644 CPSE 646 CPSE 647 CPSE 648 CPSE 649 CPSE 656 CPSE 679R CPSE 702 CPSE 710 CPSE 715 CPSE 725 CPSE 744 CPSE 746 CPSE 748 CPSE 751 CPSE 776R CPSE 777R CPSE 778R
Linked to BYU Aims: Competence, Lifelong learning
Counseling Ethics

Students demonstrate competence in identifying and successfully resolving ethical issues in the science and practice of counseling psychology.  

Courses that Contribute: CPSE 644 CPSE 646 CPSE 647 CPSE 648 CPSE 649 CPSE 656 CPSE 679R CPSE 702 CPSE 710 CPSE 715 CPSE 725 CPSE 744 CPSE 746 CPSE 751 CPSE 776R
Linked to BYU Aims: Think soundly, Lifelong learning
Integration of Spiritual Issues

Students are able to appropriately integrate spiritual and religious issues into the science and practice of counseling psychology

Courses that Contribute: CPSE 644 CPSE 646 CPSE 647 CPSE 649 CPSE 656 CPSE 679R CPSE 702 CPSE 710 CPSE 715 CPSE 744 CPSE 751
Linked to BYU Aims: Faith and testimony, Gospel knowledge
Multicultural Competence

Students demonstrate multicultural competence in the science and practice of counseling psychology.  

Courses that Contribute: CPSE 644 CPSE 646 CPSE 647 CPSE 649 CPSE 656 CPSE 679R CPSE 702 CPSE 710 CPSE 715 CPSE 725 CPSE 744 CPSE 746 CPSE 751 CPSE 779R CPSE 790R
Linked to BYU Aims: Human knowledge, Competence

Evidence of Learning


Direct Measures

1. Scholarship

2. Counseling Practice

3. Counseling Ethics

4. Respect for Diversity

5. Integration of Spiritual Issues

Indirect Measures

1. Scholarship

2. Counseling Practice

3. Counseling Ethics

4. Respect for Diversity

5. Integration of Spiritual Issues

Learning and Teaching Assessment and Improvement


Analysis, Evaluation, and Improvement Process

Our program's self-assessment process is ongoing and includes a number of components. We evaluate the program's effectiveness in achieving distal program goals and objectives (i.e., its outcomes) by collecting data on the progress and achievements of our current and recently graduated students. Two procedures that assist us in this task are (1) the completion of annual APA reports, which request specific information about our current and past students, and (2) sending out an alumni survey every three years to graduates of the program to collect up-to-date information about their professional status and to solicit their feedback about their perceptions of the quality of the training they received in our program.

We evaluate the program's effectiveness in achieving the program's proximal educational and training objectives by conducting a variety of student evaluations throughout the year. These evaluation methods include course exams, comprehensive examinations, practicum and clerkship supervisor evaluations, end of semester evaluations, performance evaluations, and dissertation oral exams. Tracking students' progress in an ongoing manner provides faculty with regular insight into whether the program's coursework and other training offerings are producing the desired proximal outcomes.

We also seek feedback about the program's effectiveness by seeking student feedback on a regular basis. We seek feedback from students about our program by assigning a student to represent the Ph.D. students each week at our faculty meetings and by assigning one faculty member to be a Graduate Student Advisor. One of the responsibilities of the student representative and Graduate Student Advisor has been to seek and convey feedback from students to the faculty about program policies and suggested changes.

In 1999 we implemented two additional procedures for formally soliciting student feedback about the program. First, we constructed a questionnaire that allows students to present their views on the quality of the program. Second, we hold an annual student program feedback and evaluation meeting each year where students are invited and encouraged to share feedback about the program and to offer suggestions for strengthening it.

Relationship of Program Outcome Data with Educational Philosophy, Goals, and Objectives

One of the program's distal outcomes is that we desire that our students obtain employment in university and college settings, and with lesser frequency, in other mental health settings. Another important distal outcome of the program is that we desire that our students pass the psychology licensure exam and obtain licensure as a psychologist. A third distal outcome we desire is that our graduates will eventually take positions of leadership within the profession. A fourth distal outcome we desire for our graduates is that some of them will contribute through professional presentations and publications to the advancement of research and scholarship in the field.

We gather outcome data about these distal outcomes by surveying program graduates. In the past we have done this on an as needed basis by contacting graduates by phone or survey. As explained above, we now send out an Alumni Survey to program graduates every 3rd year. This survey asks graduates about their past and current employment, licensure status, awards, publications, and so on. It also asks them to provide feedback regarding their perceptions of the quality of the program.