School Psychology EdS

Program Purpose


Aligned with the mission of Brigham Young University, the BYU School Psychology Program seeks to prepare skilled, compassionate professionals who creatively problem solve with keen intellect, strong faith, and moral character. We strive to instill within our candidates the desire to continue learning and serving others throughout their lives.

Specifically, we prepare school psychologists to enhance positive development for all students:

Curricular Structure

The sequence of courses required for the Ed.S. degree in School Psychology are found on this website: http://education.byu.edu/cpse/eds/required_courses.html A brief overview of the School Psychology Program is also described in the Graduate Catalog and the program's handbook (pages 14-16) accessed on this website: School Psychology Handbook

Learning Outcomes


Domain 1: Data-Based Decision Making & Accountability

School psychology students will have knowledge of varied models and methods of assessment and data collection for identifying an individual child's, group's, or program's strengths and needs; will demonstrate the ability to develop and implement effective services and programs; and will gather data to monitor progress and outcomes.

Courses that Contribute: CPSE 602 CPSE 607 CPSE 609 CPSE 610 CPSE 613 CPSE 614 CPSE 678R CPSE 688R
Linked to BYU Aims: Think soundly, Quantitative reasoning
Domain 2: Consultation and Collaboration

To promote effective implementation of services, school psychology students' course work and service delivery will demonstrate knowledge and application of varied models and strategies of consultation, collaboration, and communication applicable to individuals, families, groups, and systems and methods.  

 

 

Courses that Contribute: CPSE 606 CPSE 609 CPSE 610 CPSE 613 CPSE 614 CPSE 622 CPSE 655 CPSE 678R CPSE 688R
Linked to BYU Aims: Communicate effectively, Competence
Domain 3: Academic Interventions & Instructional Support

School psychology students' course work and service delivery will demonstrate knowledge of biological, cultural, and social influences on academic skills; human learning, cognitive, and developmental processes; and evidence-based curricula and instructional strategies. 

 

 

 

Courses that Contribute: CPSE 609 CPSE 613 CPSE 614 CPSE 622 CPSE 678R CPSE 688R
Linked to BYU Aims: Quantitative reasoning, Competence
Domain 4: Intervention/Mental Health Services; Life Skills

As evidenced in their course work and service delivery, school psychology students will have knowledge of biological, cultural, developmental, and social influences on behavior and mental health, behavioral and emotional impacts on learning and life skills, and evidence-based strategies to promote social–emotional functioning and mental health.

 

 

 

Courses that Contribute: CPSE 602 CPSE 607 CPSE 608 CPSE 609 CPSE 613 CPSE 614 CPSE 678R CPSE 688R
Linked to BYU Aims: Communicate effectively, Competence
Domain 5: School-Wide Practices to Promote Learning

As evidenced in course work and service delivery, school psychology students will have knowledge of school and systems structure, organization, and theory; general and special education; technology resources; and evidence-based school practices that promote learning and mental health.   

Courses that Contribute: CPSE 602 CPSE 606 CPSE 607 CPSE 609 CPSE 622 CPSE 678R CPSE 688R
Linked to BYU Aims: Communicate effectively, Competence
Domain 6: Preventive and Responsive Services

As evidenced in course work and service delivery, school psychology students will have knowledge of school and systems structure, organization, and theory; general and special education; technology resources; and evidence-based school practices that promote learning and mental health.   

Courses that Contribute: CPSE 605 CPSE 606 CPSE 610 CPSE 613 CPSE 678R CPSE 688R
Linked to BYU Aims: Communicate effectively, Competence
Domain 7: Family and School Collaboration Services

As evidenced in course work and service delivery, school psychology students will have knowledge of principles and research related to family systems, strengths, needs, and culture; evidence-based strategies to support family influences on children's learning and mental health; and strategies to develop collaboration between families and schools.  

Courses that Contribute: CPSE 602 CPSE 606 CPSE 608 CPSE 655 CPSE 678R CPSE 688R
Linked to BYU Aims: Think soundly, Competence
Domain 8: Diversity in Development and Learning

As evidenced in course work and service delivery, school psychology students will have knowledge of individual differences, abilities, disabilities, and other diverse student characteristics; principles and research related to diversity factors for children, families, and schools, including factors related to culture, context, and individual and role difference; and evidence-based strategies to enhance services and address potential influences related to diversity.  

Courses that Contribute: CPSE 602 CPSE 605 CPSE 606 CPSE 610 CPSE 613 CPSE 655 CPSE 678R CPSE 688R
Linked to BYU Aims: Communicate effectively, Character
Domain 9: Research and Program Evaluation

As evidenced in course work, service delivery, and in their thesis project, school psychology students will have knowledge of research design, statistics, measurement, varied data collection and analysis techniques, and program evaluation sufficient for understanding research, interpreting data in applied settings, and explaining data to parents and teachers.

Courses that Contribute: CPSE 606 CPSE 613 CPSE 655 CPSE 678R CPSE 688R CPSE 699R
Linked to BYU Aims: Quantitative reasoning, Lifelong learning
Domain 10: Legal, Ethical, and Professional Practice

As evidenced in course work and service delivery, school psychology students will have knowledge of the history and foundations of school psychology; multiple service models and methods; ethical, legal, and professional standards; and other factors related to professional identity and effective practice as school psychologists.

Courses that Contribute: CPSE 605 CPSE 606 CPSE 607 CPSE 609 CPSE 613 CPSE 655 CPSE 678R CPSE 688R CPSE 699R
Linked to BYU Aims: Competence, Lifelong service

Evidence of Learning


Direct Measures

Student's internship portfolios are organized around the 10 NASP domains, identical to the BYU School Psychology Program's 10 learning outcomes. Students demonstrate competencies in each of the 10 domains, including work samples and site-based evaluations of their performance. Faculty evaluate student portfolios. Faculty guidelines for evaluating students' portfolios are included in the Ed.S. Handbook (online), pp. 95-98. This information also describes the content of internship portfolios. Across students' three years in the program, each incoming cohort uses the handbook that is provided for the year that they enter the program. For example, those entering the program in 2015 and graduating in 2018 use the 2015-2016 handbook.

Practicum and internship experiences are field-based (K-12 schools). Field-based supervisors complete feedback evaluation forms during Fall and Winter semesters. These evaluation forms are explicitly aligned with the 10 NASP domains so that students receive specific feedback regarding their developing competencies. The program's handbook gives examples of these evaluations (for practicum evaluation see pp. 45-48; for internship evaluation see pp. 99-102). Minimally, students are expected to receive satisfactory ratings in each of the 10 NASP domains.

Students also include their School Psychology Praxis Exam scores in their internship portfolios. This Praxis exam is reported in one major overall score and four sub-area scores: Area 1: Professional practices that permeate all areas of service (covers Domains 1 and 2); Area 2: Direct and indirect services for children, families, and schools (covers Domains 3, 4, 5, and 6); Area 3: Systems level services (covers Domains 7 and 8); and Area 4: Foundations of school psychological services (covers Domains 9 and 10).  An overall passing score is identified as 147, indicating the student scores in the top 75% of school psychologists who take the exam for state and national certification/licensure. This is the same score that is identified for NASP's National Certification in School Psychology, the NCSP.

Learning and Teaching Assessment and Improvement


Several activities contribute to a culture of continual assessment of both student and program progress and effectiveness. Efforts are made to address weaknesses in individual student performance and programmatic curriculum, including learning activities and practicum/internship experiences. The BYU School Psychology Program seeks to have an ongoing self-assessment process that includes several components. Self assessment is imperative in creating and maintaining a culture of assessment and intervention that effectively and efficiently achieves student learning outcomes. Program assessment components are organized on several levels:

Student-based evaluations:

Student end-of-semester evaluations  Each semester (Fall and Winter) matriculated students are evaluated by faculty regarding student knowledge, skills, and dispositions (see example of End-of-Semester Graduate Student Evaluation on pp. 39-40 in program handbook). Specific remediation plans are identified to address student weaknesses. In addition to providing student feedback to individual students, the program also uses these evaluations to identify program strengths and weaknesses (patterns are noted). Program changes are discussed as needed to address the weak spots and how to better prepare students for the profession.

Exit interviews  Students participate in a one-on-one faculty-student interview just prior to graduation (see p. 105 of online Eds SP Handbook). The faculty member conducting the interview takes notes and then summarizes these notes. Summaries of these interviews help faculty understand students' perspectives of program strengths and limitations. Interviews are discussed in faculty meeting with proposals made to strengthen the program as needed.

Student portfolios, case studies, and Praxis Exam Scores  Student portfolios include work samples and data for each of the 10 NASP domains. Portfolios demonstrate evidence that students are facilitating positive change in children's lives. These data also provide evidence of program strengths and weaknesses. Praxis Exam Scores demonstrate how BYU students achieve on a nationally standardized test. Reviewing individual and cohort area Praxis scores assist faculty in understanding and responding to related classes and curriculum.

Site-based supervisor evaluations and feedback  These evaluations of students' performance informs faculty about students professional, field-based competencies in each of the 10 NASP domains (learning outcomes). When consistent weaknesses are reported across cohorts, appropriate changes are made. Additionally, students provide feedback about placement sites (p. 55 of EdS Program Handbook). If field-based sites do not facilitate student growth, those sites are avoided in the future or recommendations for changes are made to field-based supervisors and district supervisors. Site-based supervisors' evaluation forms are included in the Ed.S. Program Handbook on pp. 96-104.

NOTE: Ongoing tracking of student progress assists faculty in determining if coursework and field-based experiences are yielding desired outcomes in each of the 10 identified learning outcomes (10 NASP Domains).

Program level assessments:

Alumni and employer survey: Each cohort of alumni and their employers (3 years after graduation) are surveyed to determine how graduates demonstrate competency in the field, post-graduation. Aggregated data from surveys provide information about specific field-based competencies of graduates. When specific weaknesses are identified, these weaknesses are addressed through changes in course requirements and changes in required field-based experiences.

Faculty teaching evaluations: These evaluations provide faculty with student perceptions of learning. When students rate a course as less effective, instructors use this feedback to improve teaching and learning activities. Learning objectives, learning activities, and learning outcomes are carefully scrutinized and modified as needed to strengthen students' learning experiences. Students' evaluations of professor's teaching covers a wide variety of areas (teacher preparedness, satisfaction with textbook, fairness of grading, dedication to student learning, etc.).

These program-level assessments assist faculty in making needed improvements. Recommendations for change are based on cohort and group data. Minimally, these data are reviewed and discussed annually by the faculty.  These data are also needed for maintaining national program approval (NASP) and university accreditation.