Educational Leadership EDD

Program Purpose


The BYU EdD Program in Educational Leadership prepares mid-career leaders for advanced leadership positions in educational institutions. The goal of the program is to equip moral leaders to use research and best practices to improve learning, social equity, and other important outcomes in educational settings and communities.  Graduates will have the knowledge, skills, self-efficacy, and values and dispositions to reveal inequities in student achievement and to lead the industry in improving teaching, research, and learning in educaton institutions.

The program focuses on preparing candidates for the following roles:

  1. Collaborative leaders and change agents for systemic reform, who facilitate best practices, utilize data, and manage the change processes in collaboration with fellow educators and other stakeholders based on a shared vision of learning.
  2. Data-driven decision makers, who use and develop appropriate data and technology systems critically and effectively to assess student achievement; evaluate colleagues, staff and programs; and plan and implement accountability and transparency in systems.
  3. Critical consumers of research, who apply the lessons of research to student, school/district, or societal improvement.
  4. Culturally proficient agents for educational equity, who promote educational equity andculturally sensitive policies and practices, recognizing and valuing differences that improve learning and achievement.

Curricular Structure

Program Design

Requirements for Degree

Degree requirements include no electives.  The program will follow the cohort delivery method, which results in a very specific and concentrated field of inquiry. Requirements include satisfactory completion of coursework consisting of 87 credit hours distributed as (1) up to 36 hours of credit for completion of an appropriate master's or comparable degree, (2) 39 hours of core disciplinary subject matter coursework, and (2) 12 hours of dissertation credit.   Students will also be required to pass a screening after the first year to continue the program into the second and third years. Subsequently, they will also be required to complete a comprehensive exam (described below) and successfully complete a dissertation.

Program design features are intended to avoid competition with or duplication of existing PhD programs in the School of Education; they have been designed to utilize all the unique strengths of an EdD model as studied and developed by nationally ranked peers in the Carnegie Project on the Education Doctorate. The prerequisites, proposed curricula, and schedules follow.

Coursework

Coursework, as outlined in the following matrix and table, will be delivered six weekends per semester, Friday from 4:00 pm until 10:00 pm and Saturday from 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, for the completion of 6 credit hours each semester and during the summer term.  Summer terms will require full-time registration for 6 credits during the 7-week summer term, which may be offered on 6 intensive weekends or two weeks of residency.  This schedule will result in at least as many hours of traditional course time as other doctoral  programs in the Department of Educational Leadership and Foundations.  This method of delivery allows students from across the region or nation to pursue doctoral studies at BYU.  In addition, this delivery method will, we believe, result in more intensive and powerful pedagogy and fuller utilization of students' resources.  While at BYU students will be focused completely and exhaustively on coursework, research, and library experiences. In intervening weeks they will be working to prepare for challenging work in the continuing curriculum.

Comprehensive Exam

To be admitted to final doctoral candidacy, students must complete a comprehensive examination and all coursework with satisfactory ratings. The comprehensive examination will consist of 10 page integration and synthesis, situating the paper in the larger context of educational leadership and utilizing knowledge gained from all courses.  An oral defense of the integration paper will be held by the major members dissertation committee who will determine a successful passing or required remediation. 

Dissertation

Candidates will also complete a dissertation focused on active research confronting current issues and problems in education in ways that will improve educational practice. Dissertations produced by EdD candidates will be submitted to national peer-reviewed journals for possible publications. Faculty chairs or doctoral committee members may be co-authors on such articles. Students may choose to do traditional dissertation or the McKay School of Education's hybrid dissertation, as approved by the university and described below.

1.  The hybrid dissertation will require the defense of a prospectus and a final oral defense.

2.  The prospectus document will be comprised of

a.  an in-depth literature review, and

b. a thorough description of the methods to be employed in the study.

3.  The prospectus defense should lead to refinements in logic and methods.

4.  The student will also submit an IRB request if necessary.

5.  Following data collection and analysis, a final oral defense will be scheduled in compliance with university guidelines.

The document presented for final oral defense will be a journal-ready manuscript that has been written for a specific journal (agreed on by the department, committee, and student) and formatted and structured according to the requirements of that journal.

The document delivered to the Dean's Office for review and ETD submission will include the following:

1.  The signature and cover pages required by The Office of Graduate Studies

2.  A one-page introduction/abstract that positions the study

3.  The journal-ready manuscript

4.  The review of literature as Appendix A

5.  A description of the methods employed in the study at the level required for an IRB submission as Appendix B.

 

 

Graduate Catalog

Program Information

Learning Outcomes


The EdD in Educational Leadership program prepares mid-career leaders for advanced leadership positions in educational institutions. Graduates will exhibit the dispositions, knowledge, and skills to make educational organizations transformational places for preparing all students, regardless of background or individual circumstances, for a productive and fulfilling life and to contribute to the improvement of our society. The goal of the program is to equip ethical leaders to use research and best practices to improve learning, personal and societal well-being, and other important outcomes in educational settings "where a commitment to excellence and the full realization of human potential is pursued" (BYU Mission Statement) for all students.

Graduates of this program will be able to:

Collaborative leaders and change agents

Collaborative leaders and change agents for systemic reform, who facilitate best practices, utilize data, and manage the change processes in collaboration with fellow educators and other stakeholders based on a shared vision of learning.

Courses that Contribute: None
Linked to BYU Aims: Think soundly, Communicate effectively
Data-driven decision makers

Data-driven decision makers, who use and develop appropriate data and technology systems critically and effectively to assess student achievement; evaluate colleagues, staff and programs; and plan and implement accountability and transparency in systems.

Courses that Contribute: None
Linked to BYU Aims: Quantitative reasoning, Lifelong learning
Critical consumers of research

Critical consumers of research, who apply the lessons of research to student, school/district, or societal improvement.

Courses that Contribute: None
Linked to BYU Aims: Competence, Lifelong service
Culturally proficient agents for educational equity

Culturally proficient agents for educational equity, who promote educational equity andculturally sensitive policies and practices, recognizing and valuing differences that improve learning and achievement.

Courses that Contribute: None
Linked to BYU Aims: Human knowledge, Character

Evidence of Learning


In the Ed.D program, learning is assessed in several key ways.

Academic Preparation: The following tools are used to measure students' academic preparation and learning:

Exit: The following tools are also used to measure students' final performance and the continuing impact of their learning:

Alumni: Alumni surveys are gathered from alumni every three years.

Direct Measures

1. Comprehensive Examination

2. Dissertation and accompanying peer-reviewed journal article.

 

Indirect Measures

1. Course Grades

2. Graduate Student Progress Reports

3. Exit Survey

4. Exit Interview

Learning and Teaching Assessment and Improvement

Exit interviews with students. feedback from faculty and outside consultants will be used to assess the program's learning outcomes.

Course evaluations, and our own students' descriptions of pluses and minuses in this new program and its course delivery structure will be sought in mid-course evaluation surveys and be reviewed and utilized in further development. 

 

Assessment Tools

One-on-one faculty advisement, course grades, comprehensive exam development and acceptance with its paper, prospectus defense, dissertation defense, alumni survey, graduate progress report, annual review in faculty meeting of every doctoral student, submission of dissertation research for presentation at a professional conference, occasional review of dissertations by an external reviewer.

Learning and Teaching Assessment and Improvement


The department's doctoral program committee completes a comprehensive review of the the degree program annually. Recommendations from the committee are presented to the entire department faculty for review, discussion, and decision-making. Decisions and follow-up assignments are recorded in meeting minutes and addressed at future faculty meetings.