Comparative Law LLM

Program Purpose


The Master of Law (LLM) program in Comparative Law provides an opportunity for lawyers trained outside the United States to study the laws and legal system of the United States. It seeks to provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging course of study. Consistent with the Aims of a BYU Education, it strives to be spiritually strengthening, intellectually enlarging, and character building, leading to lifelong learning and service.

Mission and Goals of the J. Reuben Clark Law School

The mission of the J. Reuben Clark Law School is to teach the laws of men in the light of the laws of God. The Law School strives to be worthy in all respects of the name it bears, and to provide an education that is spiritually strengthening, intellectually enlarging, and character building, thus leading to lifelong learning and service.

The Law School's goals are to:

1. Teach the fundamental principles of law, using a predominantly theoretical approach, with appropriate attention to the basic skills involved in lawyering.

2. Promote loyalty to and understanding of the Constitution of the United States.

3. Foster an enlightened devotion to the rule of law.

4. Teach the law from a scholarly and objective point of view, with the largest latitude in the matters being considered.

5. Incorporate religious, ethical, and moral values in the instruction.

6. Produce influential and enduring legal scholarship.

7. Be part of Brigham Young University in all respects, fully participating and contributing in the intellectual and spiritual life of the University.

See The Aims of a BYU Education (1995); Marion G. Romney, Address, in Addresses at the Ceremony Opening the J. Reuben Clark Law School 17, 20 (Aug. 27, 1973); Dallin H. Oaks, Address, in Addresses at the Ceremony Opening the J. Reuben Clark Law School 3 (Aug. 27, 1973); Dallin H. Oaks, Ethics, Morality, and Professional Responsibility, 1975 B.Y.U. L. Rev. 591.

Curricular Structure

The Master of Law (LLM) program is a two-semester course of study and requires 24 credit hours for graduation. Students must take Introduction to American Law, Legal Research and Writing, and one required first-year JD course. In addition, LLM students select other courses offered in the JD program, and can earn up to six credit hours by writing a thesis under the supervision of a faculty adviser.

Law School Information

Graduate Catalog

Learning Outcomes


Law and Legal System of the United States

Students will demonstrate competency in explaining and applying fundamental principles regarding the law and legal system of the United States.

Courses that Contribute: None
Linked to BYU Aims: Human knowledge, Competence
Legal Analysis, Research, and Advocacy

Students will be able to engage in legal analysis, research, and advocacy pertinent to the United States legal system.

Courses that Contribute: None
Linked to BYU Aims: Think soundly, Competence

Evidence of Learning


Assessment Tools

The following tools are used for program assessment:

Learning Outcome 1. Students will understand fundamental principles regarding the law and legal system of the United States.

Direct measures:

a. Evaluation of student performances in Introduction to American Law.

b. Examinations, papers, and evaluations of demonstrated professional skills.

c. Participation in class discussions.

Indirect measures:

a. Alumni Questionnaire.

b. Law School Survey of Student Engagement.

c. Student and peer evaluations of teaching.

d. Annual reports and annual interviews of faculty.

e. Five-year post continuing faculty status reviews of faculty.

f. Placement of graduates.

g. Attrition rates.

h. Periodic accreditation reviews by the American Bar Association and membership reviews by the Association of American Law Schools, which review the curriculum, the quality of instruction, examination answers, and other matters.

i. Periodic academic unit reviews by the University.

Learning Outcome 2. Students will be able to engage in legal analysis, reasoning, and problem solving.

Direct measures:

a. Examinations, papers, and evaluations of demonstrated professional skills.

b. Participation in class discussions.

Indirect measures:

a. Alumni Questionnaire.

b. Law School Survey of Student Engagement.

c. Student and peer evaluations of teaching.

d. Annual reports and annual interviews of faculty.

e. Five-year post continuing faculty status reviews of faculty.

f. Placement of graduates.

g. Attrition rates.

h. Periodic accreditation reviews by the American Bar Association and membership reviews by the Association of American Law Schools, which review the curriculum, the quality of instruction, examination answers, and other matters.

i. Periodic academic unit reviews by the University.

Learning Outcome 3. Students will be able to perform legal research.

Direct measures:

a. Evaluations of student performances in Legal Research and Writing.

b. Papers and evaluations of demonstrated professional skills.

Indirect measures:

a. Alumni Questionnaire.

b. Law School Survey of Student Engagement.

c. LibQual+ Survey regarding the law library.

d. Student and peer evaluations of teaching.

e. Annual reports and annual interviews of faculty.

f. Five-year post continuing faculty status reviews of faculty.

g. Placement of graduates.

h. Attrition rates.

i. Periodic accreditation reviews by the American Bar Association and membership reviews by the Association of American Law Schools, which review the curriculum, the quality of instruction, examination answers, the law library, and other matters.

j. Periodic academic unit reviews by the University.

Learning Outcome 4. Students will be able to communicate effectively orally and in writing regarding legal matters.

Direct measures:

a. Evaluations of student performances in Legal Research and Writing.

b. Examinations, papers, and evaluations of demonstrated professional skills.

c. Participation in class discussions.

Indirect measures:

a. Alumni Questionnaire.

b. Law School Survey of Student Engagement.

c. Student and peer evaluations of teaching.

d. Annual reports and annual interviews of faculty.

e. Five-year post continuing faculty status reviews of faculty.

f. Placement of graduates.

g. Attrition rates.

h. Periodic accreditation reviews by the American Bar Association and membership reviews by the Association of American Law Schools, which review the curriculum, the quality of instruction, examination answers, and other matters.

i. Periodic academic unit reviews by the University.

Learning Outcome 5. Students will have the ability and desire to engage in lifelong learning and service.

Direct measures:

a. Examinations, papers, and evaluations of demonstrated professional skills.

b. Participation in class discussions.

c. Participation in service-learning courses and experiences.

Indirect measures:

a. Alumni Questionnaire.

b. Law School Survey of Student Engagement.

c. Student and peer evaluations of teaching.

d. Annual reports and annual interviews of faculty.

e. Five-year post continuing faculty status reviews of faculty.

f. Placement of graduates.

g. Attrition rates.

h. Periodic accreditation reviews by the American Bar Association and membership reviews by the Association of American Law Schools, which review the curriculum, the quality of instruction, examination answers, and other matters.

i. Periodic academic unit reviews by the University.


Assessment information is collected regularly and retained in the deans' offices, the registrar's office, and the Career Services Office.

Learning and Teaching Assessment and Improvement


The deans review assessment data as they are reported, and share data with the appropriate Law School committees. The deans and other faculty members refer curricular issues to the Curriculum Committee. In addition, the Curriculum Committee conducts periodic reviews of the curriculum to ensure that it accomplishes the Law School's objectives. Teaching assessment and improvement are addressed in annual interviews and five-year post continuing faculty status reviews of faculty. The Law School prepares extensive self-studies in connection with periodic accreditation reviews by the American Bar Association, membership reviews by the Association of American Law Schools, and academic unit reviews by the University, and the Law School implements recommendations that emerge through those processes. The Law School has more than twenty committees on which faculty members serve, and students serve on some committees. Committees address issues and present proposals to the faculty for consideration and action. The faculty also has annual retreats which address improving learning and teaching.