Law JD

Program Purpose


The Juris Doctor (JD) program seeks to provide a rigorous and intellectually challenging legal education that prepares students to function in the wide range of activities that occupy a lawyer's professional life. It serves highly qualified students who have a strong undergraduate preparation. Consistent with the Aims of a BYU Education, it strives to be spiritually strengthening, intellectually enlarging, and character building, leading to lifelong learning and service.

Mission and Goals of the J. Reuben Clark Law School

The mission of the J. Reuben Clark Law School is to teach the laws of men in the light of the laws of God. The Law School strives to be worthy in all respects of the name it bears, and to provide an education that is spiritually strengthening, intellectually enlarging, and character building, thus leading to lifelong learning and service.

The Law School's goals are to:

1. Teach the fundamental principles of law, using a predominantly theoretical approach, with appropriate attention to the basic skills involved in lawyering.

2. Promote loyalty to and understanding of the Constitution of the United States.

3. Foster an enlightened devotion to the rule of law.

4. Teach the law from a scholarly and objective point of view, with the largest latitude in the matters being considered.

5. Incorporate religious, ethical, and moral values in the instruction.

6. Produce influential and enduring legal scholarship.

7. Be part of Brigham Young University in all respects, fully participating and contributing in the intellectual and spiritual life of the University.

See The Aims of a BYU Education (1995); Marion G. Romney, Address, in Addresses at the Ceremony Opening the J. Reuben Clark Law School 17, 20 (Aug. 27, 1973); Dallin H. Oaks, Address, in Addresses at the Ceremony Opening the J. Reuben Clark Law School 3 (Aug. 27, 1973); Dallin H. Oaks, Ethics, Morality, and Professional Responsibility, 1975 B.Y.U. L. Rev. 591.

Curricular Structure

The Juris Doctor (JD) program is a six-semester course of study and requires 90 credit hours for graduation. The first-year curriculum emphasizes legal analysis and reasoning, legal research and writing, and subjects that are generally regarded in legal education as foundational for further law study. The first-year required courses are Civil Procedure, Contracts, Criminal Law, Property, Torts, Structures of the Constitution, Perspectives on Law, Introduction to Legal Research and Writing, and Introduction to Advocacy. First-year students may also take elective Professional Development Lectures, Professional Development Skills Training, and Professional Seminar. In the second and third years, Professional Responsibility is required, and the other courses are elective. In addition, each student must produce a substantial paper in the second or third year. The Law School offers the JD portion of the following joint degrees: JD/MBA, JD/MPA, JD/MAcc, JD/MEd, and JD/MPP. Law credit awarded for the non-law portion of these programs ranges from six to twelve credits. The Law School has six student-managed co-curricular programs through which students can earn credit outside the classroom: Brigham Young University Law Review (students edit and write publications relating to the law); BYU Journal of Public Law (students edit and write publications relating to public law); Brigham Young University Education and Law Journal (students edit and write publications relating to education and law); BYU International Law and Management Review (students edit and write publications relating to international law and management); Moot Court/Board of Advocates (students receive experience in appellate advocacy); and Trial Advocacy (students receive experience in trial advocacy).

Law School Information

Graduate Catalog

Learning Outcomes


Competency in Explaining and Applying Fundamental Principles

Students will demonstrate competency in explaining and applying the fundamental principles of Civil Procedure, Contracts, Criminal Law, Property, Structures of the Constitution, Torts, Legislation and Regulation, and Professional Responsibility.

Courses that Contribute: LAW 612 LAW 627 LAW 649 LAW 654 LAW 669 LAW 675 LAW 677 LAW 688 LAW 689 LAW 692 LAW 693 LAW 694 LAW 697 LAW 711 LAW 737 LAW 738 LAW 739 LAW 740 LAW 744 LAW 745 LAW 748 LAW 749 LAW 750 LAW 751 LAW 753 LAW 754 LAW 757 LAW 758
Linked to BYU Aims: Think soundly, Competence
Legal Analysis, Reasoning, and Problem Solving

Students will be able to engage in legal analysis, reasoning, and problem solving.

Courses that Contribute: LAW 505 LAW 510 LAW 515 LAW 520 LAW 525 LAW 530 LAW 535 LAW 545 LAW 546 LAW 550 LAW 551 LAW 601 LAW 602 LAW 603 LAW 607 LAW 608 LAW 609 LAW 610 LAW 612 LAW 613 LAW 615 LAW 616 LAW 617 LAW 619 LAW 621 LAW 622 LAW 623 LAW 624 LAW 625 LAW 626 LAW 627 LAW 628 LAW 630 LAW 632 LAW 633 LAW 634 LAW 635 LAW 639 LAW 640 LAW 641 LAW 643 LAW 645 LAW 650 LAW 652 LAW 653 LAW 654 LAW 655 LAW 656 LAW 658 LAW 659 LAW 660 LAW 662 LAW 663 LAW 665 LAW 666 LAW 668 LAW 669 LAW 674 LAW 675 LAW 677 LAW 678 LAW 681 LAW 683 LAW 684 LAW 685 LAW 688 LAW 689 LAW 692 LAW 693 LAW 694 LAW 697 LAW 700 LAW 702 LAW 703 LAW 705 LAW 706 LAW 707 LAW 708 LAW 710 LAW 711 LAW 715 LAW 719 LAW 724 LAW 726 LAW 737 LAW 738 LAW 739 LAW 740 LAW 742 LAW 744 LAW 745 LAW 748 LAW 750 LAW 751 LAW 753 LAW 754 LAW 757 LAW 758 LAW 790R LAW 792R LAW 793R LAW 798R
Linked to BYU Aims: Think soundly, Lifelong learning
Legal Research, Writing, and Advocacy

Students will be able to perform legal research, legal writing, and legal advocacy.

Courses that Contribute: LAW 505 LAW 510 LAW 515 LAW 520 LAW 525 LAW 545 LAW 546 LAW 551 LAW 552 LAW 601 LAW 602 LAW 603 LAW 607 LAW 608 LAW 610 LAW 613 LAW 615 LAW 616 LAW 617 LAW 619 LAW 621 LAW 622 LAW 623 LAW 625 LAW 626 LAW 627 LAW 630 LAW 632 LAW 633 LAW 634 LAW 635 LAW 639 LAW 640 LAW 641 LAW 643 LAW 650 LAW 652 LAW 653 LAW 654 LAW 655 LAW 656 LAW 658 LAW 660 LAW 662 LAW 665 LAW 668 LAW 669 LAW 674 LAW 675 LAW 677 LAW 678 LAW 681 LAW 683 LAW 684 LAW 689 LAW 693 LAW 694 LAW 700 LAW 702 LAW 703 LAW 705 LAW 706 LAW 707 LAW 708 LAW 710 LAW 711 LAW 715 LAW 720 LAW 724 LAW 726 LAW 739 LAW 740 LAW 741 LAW 742 LAW 749 LAW 750 LAW 754 LAW 758 LAW 790R LAW 792R LAW 793R LAW 798R
Linked to BYU Aims: Communicate effectively, Competence
Ethical Issues

Students will be able to recognize and resolve ethical issues in light of ethical, moral, and religious principles.

Courses that Contribute: LAW 505 LAW 515 LAW 520 LAW 549 LAW 552 LAW 607 LAW 610 LAW 615 LAW 617 LAW 619 LAW 625 LAW 626 LAW 632 LAW 633 LAW 635 LAW 640 LAW 649 LAW 650 LAW 654 LAW 660 LAW 665 LAW 684 LAW 700 LAW 702 LAW 705 LAW 706 LAW 707 LAW 710 LAW 715 LAW 724
Linked to BYU Aims: Character, Lifelong service
Lifelong Learning and Service

Students will have the ability and desire to engage in lifelong learning and service.

Courses that Contribute: LAW 515 LAW 520 LAW 549 LAW 550 LAW 551 LAW 552 LAW 612 LAW 619 LAW 622 LAW 624 LAW 630 LAW 632 LAW 633 LAW 653 LAW 665 LAW 668 LAW 669 LAW 674 LAW 684 LAW 700 LAW 702 LAW 705 LAW 706 LAW 715 LAW 724 LAW 741 LAW 751
Linked to BYU Aims: Lifelong learning, Lifelong service

Evidence of Learning


Assessment Tools

The following tools are used for program assessment:

Learning Outcome 1. Students will demonstrate competency in the fundamental principles of Civil Procedure, Contracts, Criminal Law, Property, Structures of the Constitution, Torts, and Professional Responsibility.

Direct measures:

a. Bar examination pass rates.

Indirect measures:

a. Student course evaluations of "amount learned"

b. Placement of graduates

Learning Outcome 2. Students will be able to engage in legal analysis, reasoning, and problem solving.

Direct measures:

a. Bar examination pass rates.

b. Student completion of the Law School's substantial-paper requirement.

Indirect measures:

a. Alumni Questionnaire.

b. Law School Survey of Student Engagement.

c. Placement of graduates.

Learning Outcome 3. Students will be able to perform legal research, legal writing, and legal advocacy.

Direct measures:

a. Student completion of the Law School's substantial-paper requirement.

Indirect measures:

a. Student participation on boards of journals or in moot court competitions outside of the law school.

b. Alumni Questionnaire.

c. Law School Survey of Student Engagement.

d. LibQual Survey regarding the law library.

e. Placement of graduates.

f. Student course evaluations of "amount learned"

Learning Outcome 4. Students will be able to recognize and resolve ethical issues in light of ethical, moral, and religious principles.

Direct measures:

a. Bar examination pass rates.

Indirect measures:

a. Alumni Questionnaire.

b. Law School Survey of Student Engagement.

c. Student course evaluations of "amount learned".

d. Enrollment in the first-year Professional Seminar

Learning Outcome 5. Students will have the ability and desire to engage in lifelong learning and service.

Direct measures:

a. Student participation in Law School sponsored service activities.

Indirect measures:

a. Alumni Questionnaire.

b. Law School Survey of Student Engagement.

Learning and Teaching Assessment and Improvement


The deans review assessment data as they are reported, and share data with the appropriate Law School committees. The deans and other faculty members refer curricular issues to the Curriculum Committee. In addition, the Curriculum Committee conducts periodic reviews of the curriculum to ensure that it accomplishes the Law School's objectives. Teaching assessment and improvement are addressed in annual interviews and five-year post continuing faculty status reviews of faculty. The Law School prepares extensive self-studies in connection with periodic accreditation reviews by the American Bar Association, membership reviews by the Association of American Law Schools, and academic unit reviews by the University, and the Law School implements recommendations that emerge through those processes. The Law School has more than twenty committees on which faculty members serve, and students serve on some committees. Committees address issues and present proposals to the faculty for consideration and action. The faculty also has annual retreats which address improving learning and teaching.